PRESS RELEASE

Unplugged Architecture
January 8 - February 7, 2004

Raimund Abraham, Hans Accola, Walter Andersons, Asymptote, Rashid + Couture, Mary Ellen Carroll, Winka Dubbeldam, Carlos Garaicoa, Wade Guyton, John Hejduk, Marjetica Potrc, Glen Seator, Thomas Zummer

Frederieke Taylor gallery is pleased to present Unplugged Architecture curated by Max Henry

This group exhibition of work by artists and architects explores the co-existence of the hi-fi aspects of architecture (digital technology and software) with the lo-fi, handmade aspects of the plastic arts. The audiophile tends to reject the compact disc's "cold sound", preferring instead the l.p. for its warmth and tone. Yet, in the on-going discourse of art and architecture, new technologies are continuously reconciled with past ones. Similarly, the audiophile rejects the sleek sounds of the compact disc, yet listens to music on the highest-end, new equipment.

The exhibition provides unexpected juxtapositions, uncanny similarities, and diverging sensibilities.
The works range from cinematic constructions of architectural realms (Asymptote, Zummer) to photographic documents of neo-classic ruins in contemporary Cuba (Garaicoa), near abstract architectural forms in two and three dimensions (Abraham), issues of art history in mechanical reproduction (Andersons, Guyton), spatial intervention in reproduced images from books and catalogues on art and architecture (Guyton), and a photograph showing the interior support structure of the famed Farnsworth House and the landscape on the property rather than a typical exterior image of the widely reproduced iconic house (Carroll).

Further included in Unplugged Architecture are on the fly makeshift housing solutions in battle torn regions without adequate infrastructure (Potrc), a doppelgänger of an architectural model in the form of an etching (Dubbeldam), the photographic document of a fabricated room interior with virtual qualities (Seator), and small, rarefied, wood sculptures leaning askew that appear to mimic architectural models but are in fact structural anomalies dealing with issues of space delineation within two-dimensional and three-dimensional forms (Accola). The pièce de resistance of the exhibition will be a rare John Hejduk model that illustrates some of the late architect's concerns about architectural space.

Unplugged Architecture as a whole differs from recent architecture shows by stripping away the need to present the hardware gadgets (flat panel monitors, DVD projections, etc.) to make its salient points clear. As if looking at a computer screen with the processor slowed to near stillness the show itself reveals the contextual boundaries both within real and virtual time.